Tag Archives: voice

Voice control in Space!

20 Nov

I recently attended The Association for Conversational Interaction Design (ACIXD) Brown bag “Challenges of Implementing Voice Control for Space Applications” presented by the NASA Authority in the field, George Salazar. George Salazar is Human Computing Interface Technical Discipline Lead at NASA with over 30 years of experience and innovation in Space applications. Among a long list of achievements, he was involved in the development of the International Space Station internal audio system and has been awarded several awards, including a John F. Kennedy Astronautics Award, a NASA Silver Achievement Medal and a Lifetime Achievement Award for his service and commitment to STEM. His acceptance speech for that last one brought tears to my eyes! An incredibly knowledgeable and experienced man with astounding modesty and willingness to pass his knowledge and passion to younger generations.

George Salazar’s Acceptance Speech

Back to Voice Recognition.

Mr Salazar explained how space missions slowly migrated over the years from ground control (with dozens of engineers involved) to vehicle control and from just 50 to 100s of buttons. This put the onus of operating all those buttons to the 4-5 person space crew, which in turn brought in speech recognition as an invaluable interface that would make good sense in such a complex environment. 

Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

Factors affecting ASR accuracy in Space

He described how they have tested different Speech Recognition (ASR) software to see which fared the best, both speaker-independent and speaker-dependent. As he noted, they all claim 99% accuracy officially but that is never the case in practice! He listed many factors that affect recognition accuracy, including:

  • background noise (speaker vs background signal separation)
  • multiple speakers speaking simultaneously (esp. in such a noisy environment)
  • foreign accent recognition (e.g. Dutch crew speaking English)
  • intraspeaker speech variation due to psychological factors (as being in space can, apparently, make you depressed, which in turn affects your voice!), but presumably also to physiological factors (e.g. just having a cold)
  • Astronaut gender (low pitch in males vs high pitch in females): ASR software was designed for males, so male astronauts always had better error rates!
  • The effects of microgravity (physiological effects) on the voice quality, as already observed on the first flight (using templates from ground testing as the baseline), are impossible to separate from the environment and crew stress and can lead to a 10-30% error increase!
Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

  • Even radiation can affect the ASR software, but also the hardware (computing power). As a comparison, AMAZON Alexa uses huge computer farms, whereas in Space they rely on slow “radiation-hardened” processors: they can handle the radiation, but are actually 5-10 times slower than commercial processors!
Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

Solutions to Space Challenges

To counter all these negative factors, a few different approaches and methodologies have been employed:

  • on-orbit retrain capability: rendering the system adaptive to changes in voice and background noise, resulting in up to 100% accuracy
  • macro-commanding: creating shortcuts to more complex commands
  • redundacy as fallback (i.e. pressing a button as a second modality)
Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

Critical considerations

One of the challenges that Mr Salazar mentioned in improving ASR accuracy is overadaptation or skewing the system to a single astronaut.

In addition, he mentioned the importance of Dialog Design in NASA’s human-centered design (HCD) Development approach. The astronauts should always be able to provide feedback to the system, particularly for error correction (Confusability leads to misrecognitions).

Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation
Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

In closing, Mr Salazar stressed that speech recognition for Command and Control in Space applications is viable, especially in the context of a small crew navigating a complex habitat.

Moreover, he underlined the importance of trust that the ASR system needs to inspire in its users, as in this case the astronauts may literally be placing their lives onto its performance and accuracy.

Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

Q & A

After Mr Salazar’s presentation, I couldn’t help but pose a couple of questions to him, given that I consider myself to be a Space junkie (and not in the sci-fi franchise sense either!).

So, I asked him to give us a few examples of the type of astronaut utterances and commands that their ASR needs to be able to recognise. Below are some such phrases:

  • zoom in, zoom out
  • tilt up, tilt down
  • pan left
  • please repeat

and their synonyms. He also mentioned the case of one astronaut who kept saying “Wow!” (How do you deal with that!)

I asked whether the system ever had to deal with ambiguity in trying to determine which component to tilt, pan or zoom. He answered that, although they do carry out plenty of confusability studies, the context is quite deterministic: the astronaut selects the monitor by going to the monitor section and speaking the associated command. Thus, there is no real ambiguity as such.

Screenshot from George Salazar’s ACIxD presentation

My second question to Mr Salazar was about the type of ASR they have gone for. I understood that the vocabulary is small and contained / unambiguous, but wasn’t sure whether they went for speaker-dependent or speaker-independent recognition in the end. He replied that the standard now is speaker-independent ASR, which however has been adapted to a small group of astronauts (i.e. “group-dependent“). Hence, all the challenges of distinguishing between different speakers with different pitch and accents, all against the background noise and the radiation and microgravity effects! They must be really busy!

It was a great pleasure to listen to the talk and an incredible and rare honour to get to speak with such an awe-inspiring pioneer in Space Engineering!

Ad Astra!

UBIQUITOUS VOICE: Essays from the Field now on Kindle!

14 Oct

In 2018, a new book on “Voice First” came out on Amazon and I was proud and deeply honoured, as it includes one of my articles! Now it has come out on Kindle as an e-Book and we are even more excited at the prospect of a much wider reach!

“Ubiquitous Voice: Essays from the Field”: Thoughts, insights and anecdotes on Speech Recognition, Voice User Interfaces, Voice Assistants, Conversational Intelligence, VUI Design, Voice UX issues, solutions, Best practices and visions from the veterans!

I have been part of this effort since its inception, working alongside some of the pioneers in the field who now represent the Market Leaders (GOOGLE, AMAZON, NUANCE, SAMSUNG VIV .. ). Excellent job by our tireless and intrepid Editor, Lisa Falkson!

My contribution “Convenience + Security = Trust: Do you trust your Intelligent Assistant?” is on data privacy concerns and social issues associated with the widespread adoption of voice activation. It is thus platform-, ASR-, vendor- and company-agnostic.

You can get the physical book here and the Kindle version here.

Prepare to be enlightened, guided and inspired!

Speech Interaction on Mobile Devices at SpeechTEK 2011 (New York)

7 Aug

Today sees the launch of the Joint AVIxD / IxDA Workshop on Speech Interaction on Mobile Devices that kick-starts the mother of Voice Solutions Fairs, SpeechTEK 2011 in New York next week (8-10 Aug).

AVIxD

AVIxD is the Association for Voice Interaction Design, a professional organisation that aims to

“eliminate apathy and antipathy toward the need for good design of automated voice services”, 

which has become my favourite VUI mantra!

IxDA is the Interaction Design Association, a much bigger professional “un-organisation” which  intends to:

“improve the human condition by advancing the discipline of Interaction Design”

A very worthy cause indeed, especially since it is true that “the human condition is increasingly challenged by poor experiences. “!

IxDA

Today’s Joint Workshop in New York aims to bring together interaction design practitioners from across the voice, interactive, and digital areas to identify the issues and challenges involved in  speech interaction design on mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and to come up by the end of the day with ways to approach them or even tackle them. A very ambitious format that, however, really does work!

AVIxD organised another Workshop this year on Cross-linguistic & Cross-cultural Voice Interaction Design, which was also the 1st European Workshop, just before SpeechTEK Europe in London this May past. See what we all came up with in those 6 hours in the SpeechTEK Europe PDF presentation below.

And if you don’t manage to take part in today’s workshop, make sure you go to the SpeechTEK Conference and Exhibition itself that starts tomorrow and runs until Wednesday the 10th. Listen to presentations and see or even try for yourself market-ready products relating to:

  • multimodal applications
  • cross-channel applications
  • speech analytics
  • speaker identification and verification
  • in-car systems
  • natural language and say-anything technologies
  • speech translation
  • voice-enabled personal assistants
  • as well as the latest speech recognition techniques and technologies

I particularly recommend the Keynote Panel on “Mobility — A Game-Changer for Speech?” on Tuesday on how smartphones are dramatically changing how customers interact with businesses and with the devices themselves. Some really interesting issues and questions will be raised, such as:

* How voice user interfaces will be integrated with graphical user interfaces?

or

* Will users embrace voice as they have embraced keypads on mobile devices? 

Sadly I am in the UK today and next week, so I’m going to miss it all. But if you are lucky enough to be in or near New York, make sure you go and enjoy!

SpeechTEK 2011 New York