Tag Archives: human-computer interaction

Call Centre Training e-poll

11 Oct

As part of our METALOGUE project, we have created an electronic poll (e-poll).

metalogue_replay

Our goal is to collect actual real-world requirements from Call Centre professionals that will inform our system pilot design and implementation. Through this and a number of other e-polls, we are asking some basic questions on Call Centre Agent training goals, Call Centre Agent preferences, target functionality of an automated agent training tool, etc.

We are inviting anyone from the Industry, from Call Centre Operators and Managers, Agent Trainers, to Call Centre Agents (experienced and novice) to participate. Feel free to add your own input and comments.

If you can also use the Contact form below to indicate whether you are a Call Centre Operator / Manager, Trainer, or Agent (or all of the above!), we would be able to collect some data on the demographics of the e-poll respondents.

Thank you in advance!

Human-Machine Interaction in Translation (NLPCS 2011)

21 Aug

For a few years now I have been in the Programme Committee of the International Workshop on Natural Language Processing and Cognitive Science (NLPCS), organised by a long-time colleague and friend, Dr. Bernadette Sharp from Staffordshire University. The aim of this annual workshop is “to bring together researchers and practitioners in Natural Language Processing (NLP) working within the paradigm of Cognitive Science (CS)“.

The overall emphasis of the workshop is on the contribution of cognitive science to language processing, including conceptualisation, representation, discourse processing, meaning construction, ontology building, and text mining.”

There have been NLPCS  Workshops in Porto (2004), Miami (2005), Paphos (2006), Funchal (2007), Barcelona (2008), Milan (2009) and Funchal (2010).

Copenhagen Business School

Copenhagen Business School

This year’s 8th International NLPCS Workshop just took place this weekend in Copenhagen, Denmark (20-21 Aug 2011). The Workshop topic was: “Human-Machine Interaction in Translation“, focussing on all aspects of human and machine translation, and human-computer interaction in translation, including:  translators’ experiences with CAT tools, human-machine interface design, evaluation of interactive machine translation, user simulation and human factors. Thus, the topics were approached from a number of different perspectives:

  • from full automation by machines for machine (traditional NLP or HLT)
  • semi-automated processing, i.e. machine-mediated processing (programs assisting people in their tasks),
  • but also simulation of human cognitive processes

I had the opportunity once again to review a few of the paper submissions and can therefore highly recommend reading the full Proceedings of the NLPCS 2011 Workshop that have just been made available.

I found particularly interesting the following 3 contributions:

  • Valitutti, A. “How Many Jokes are Really Funny? A New Approach to the Evaluation of Computational Humour Generators”
  • Nilsson, M. and J. Nivre. “Entropy-Driven Evaluation of Models of Eye Movement Control in Reading” 

and

  • Finch, A., Song, W., Tanaka-Ishii, K. and E. Sumita. “Source Language Generation from Pictures for Machine Translation on Mobile Devices”

Enjoy!

FutureEverything 2011 – The Future is now (here in Manchester!)

12 May

Today saw the launch of the very interdisciplinary (some would say “transdisciplinary” even) FutureEverything Festival (previously Futuresonic) , a long-running and world-renowned annual Conference and Festival of Technology and Innovation, Art and Music running from the 11th to the 14th May in Manchester , UK (@FuturEverything #futr).  Apart from the annual May events,

FutureEverything creates year-round Digital Innovation projects that combine creativity, participation and new technologies to deliver elegant business and research solutions.   In 2010 we launched the FutureEverything Award, an international prize for artworks, social innovations or software and technology projects that bring the future into the present.

I have always made a point to attend at least one music or art event every year since 2007 (when the Festival was still called Futuresonic) and I have always been particularly interested in the forward-thinking Digital Technologies Conference.  So I was over the moon when I was invited to participate in the Conference and informally share my words of wisdom on speech and language technologies for emotional computing. Armed with my complimentary Festival Pass, I am now really looking forward to 2 days (Thu 12 – Fri 13 May 2011) packed with presentations, discussions and debates on: Urban Games and Virtual Identities, Robots  and Smart Cities, open data and participatory democracy. community-serving Geeks and Hackers, Open source software and citizen inclusion, and one of my favourites, emotional computing: making human-computer interfaces personable, engaging and persuasive and interaction with them more intuitive and even fun.

The FutureEverything Conference is brainstorming on a massive scale. Combined with all the live Twitter updates and feeds, it is going to have once again viral impact worldwide with the novel, brave and infectious ideas that will be coming out of it and around it. At the same time, the use of dynamic and democratic microblogging will allow massive participation to the Conference by people on both sides of the Atlantic who are not physically present but are still listening and virtually and remotely contributing their feedback and ideas. In fact, the FutureEverything Festival and the Conference are quintessential instantiations of the perfect balance of online – offline, virtual and real, local and remote, one-to-many / many-to-one broadcasting. And I’m right in the middle of this awesome time-space continuum (May 2011 in Manchester UK)! 🙂

Update (Sun 15 May):

There is now a FutureEverything Festival Portal with a compilation of blog posts, photos, audio, video and more related to the 4 days of the Festival and Conference. Check it out here: http://www.fe-2011.org/

I will also be adding my feedback on what I heard at the Conference in the next couple of days.