Human-Machine Interaction in Translation (NLPCS 2011)

21 Aug

For a few years now I have been in the Programme Committee of the International Workshop on Natural Language Processing and Cognitive Science (NLPCS), organised by a long-time colleague and friend, Dr. Bernadette Sharp from Staffordshire University. The aim of this annual workshop is “to bring together researchers and practitioners in Natural Language Processing (NLP) working within the paradigm of Cognitive Science (CS)“.

The overall emphasis of the workshop is on the contribution of cognitive science to language processing, including conceptualisation, representation, discourse processing, meaning construction, ontology building, and text mining.”

There have been NLPCS  Workshops in Porto (2004), Miami (2005), Paphos (2006), Funchal (2007), Barcelona (2008), Milan (2009) and Funchal (2010).

Copenhagen Business School

Copenhagen Business School

This year’s 8th International NLPCS Workshop just took place this weekend in Copenhagen, Denmark (20-21 Aug 2011). The Workshop topic was: “Human-Machine Interaction in Translation“, focussing on all aspects of human and machine translation, and human-computer interaction in translation, including:  translators’ experiences with CAT tools, human-machine interface design, evaluation of interactive machine translation, user simulation and human factors. Thus, the topics were approached from a number of different perspectives:

  • from full automation by machines for machine (traditional NLP or HLT)
  • semi-automated processing, i.e. machine-mediated processing (programs assisting people in their tasks),
  • but also simulation of human cognitive processes

I had the opportunity once again to review a few of the paper submissions and can therefore highly recommend reading the full Proceedings of the NLPCS 2011 Workshop that have just been made available.

I found particularly interesting the following 3 contributions:

  • Valitutti, A. “How Many Jokes are Really Funny? A New Approach to the Evaluation of Computational Humour Generators”
  • Nilsson, M. and J. Nivre. “Entropy-Driven Evaluation of Models of Eye Movement Control in Reading” 

and

  • Finch, A., Song, W., Tanaka-Ishii, K. and E. Sumita. “Source Language Generation from Pictures for Machine Translation on Mobile Devices”

Enjoy!

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